Being Pro-Choice


I’m pro-choice. I have many reasons for being pro-choice. For one, there are 7 billion people on this planet. It’s over populated. Adding more mouths to feed just increases the number of people who will suffer from starvation. For another, many of the people who get abortions do so because they cannot afford a child. Children are expensive. They also take up a lot of a person’s time. Is it really better for a person to have to work two or three jobs so that they can afford a child, who they do not spend enough time with to actually raise, than it is for them to have an abortion? Many people will argue that the child should be put up for adoption instead. There are a lot of children waiting to be adopted. Most of them will never be adopted. Why add more children to an already overloaded system? We need to find loving homes for the existing children before we throw more children into an endless cycle of living with someone for a few months only to be taken away to live with someone else for a few months. This cycle causes sever mental and emotional damage to children. I would not want my child to suffer that fate.

People also get abortions because there is a problem with the pregnancy. The people who go through an abortion for that reason usually wanted to keep the child but can’t because the fetus either won’t live or the mother could die, or both. They are usually already emotional as it is. They are devastated and have no choice. Telling them that they should feel ashamed for having an abortion, telling them that they should give birth to a baby that they then must watch die, telling them that they should allow themselves to die, is cruel and immoral.

Those are my biggest reasons for being pro-choice from the stand point of what an abortion is. But I also have reasons for being pro-choice that pertain to the anti-choice (pro-life) movement. For one, they are not very pro-life. They do not care about life as much as they care about birth. Too many anti-choicers support war, are unwilling to help end hunger, support the gun lobby, and aren’t willing to adopt those children who need families. They don’t do anything that shows that they want to improve life for anyone who is already living. If you’re pro-life, then you should be as concerned about ending violent crime, homelessness, hunger, and poverty and you should be trying to improve health care and education. There are many ways to be pro-life that don’t involve being anti-choice. 

For another, many anti-choicers would condemn women for their decisions, or even for situations outside of their control. It is a woman’s choice if she wants to have sex. I woman should not be made to feel bad because she has a sexuality. It is normal, natural, and perfectly fine. And consenting to sex is not consenting to pregnancy. Sex is just as much about having a good time, if not more, as it is about reproduction. If reproduction was the only reason for having sex, then we’d only get horny when the woman is fertile. And we have contraceptives to keep pregnancy from occurring. However, contraceptives aren’t perfect, and pregnancy can happen even with the use of contraceptives. Anyone using contraception is decidedly not consenting to pregnancy. They should not have to remain pregnant if they do not want to. 

A woman who has been raped should definitely not be shamed for her rape. She should not be asked what she was wearing, she should not be told she was asking for it, she should not be called a slut, and she should not be made to keep her rapist’s child. She has a right to her body. That right was already violated once. It should not be violated again. Most anti-choicers are fine with abortion in the case of rape (or health risk), but the ones who aren’t are willing to take lives by forcing to remain pregnant. These women have already lived. They have already had an impact on society. They work, they go to school, they pay taxes, they have friends and loved ones. Their lives are worth more than the fetuses. Nobody should feel that they have the right to make the woman feel otherwise.

For all of these reasons, I am pro-choice.

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7 responses to “Being Pro-Choice

  • kat

    one need not defend the position that a woman’s body is her own, and anything she chooses to do to it is inherently her decision and no one else’s.

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  • proteccionparaella

    I’d ask you to know the ‘overloaded system’ you mean when you speak about pro-choice. The children in the orphanage that I work in do not have an easy life, and they do not get the attention they deserve. However, they are alive, have smiles on their face, friends, and their fair share of problems just like anyone- they are amazing children because their family picked as close to adoption as the Peruvian government allows. I did appreciate reading your standpoint so much, but know that meeting the children that were possibly the closest to being aborted in a society changes your opinion in a heartbeat- just because they will have hardship doesn’t mean that they can’t still enjoy the life that they have the right to. Please read more and comment on my blog. Thank you for sharing.

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    • hessianwithteeth

      I’m not saying that those children can’t lead good lives, I’m saying that adding more children does more harm than good. Not just to the child who gets added to the group, but to the group as a whole.
      I don’t know how things work in Peru, but in Canada foster children are turned out at 18 and are expected to fend for themselves. This is because the system cannot spare anymore to help them. There are already too many children. I’ve known a number of children who went through foster care. They never spend enough time with one family to really feel at home, they never have more than the clothes that they wear and maybe a toy or two, Many of them never graduate from high school, many find themselves homeless and addicted to drugs, and very few ever get the chance to attend college. They’re basically destined for a life of poverty. That’s something I wouldn’t wish on anyone. Personally, if my choice was abortion or adoption without knowing who the child was going to or where they’d end up, I’d choose abortion.

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      • proteccionparaella

        Thank you for explaining- and the system is similar in Peru- at the age of 18, they are ‘let loose’ (if lucky, they are given a subpar job that only provides wages for survival). This isn’t right, and it’s not right that it happens in Canada either. However, it would be interesting to hear from those foster children that you know if their parent should have chosen abortion because of the faults of the foster care/adoption system. While it is a grave issue when there is not enough to go around, it is a graver issue to end lives (or what will become a life, if you like the trendier wording better) for anything- so for something that CAN be fixed- well, that makes it even harder to swallow. I really do encourage you to be a mentor to a foster child in exactly the awful situation that you described- I really think it may make you think about everything dfiferently- and if not, you can have a VERY informed opinion on why you believe abortions are best! However, you do not touch on the psychological effects that abortions leave women with- they are often severe (insight due to connection with abortion crisis support center). Again, I so appreciate hearing your opinion- thank you for listening to mine as well.

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        • hessianwithteeth

          Asking people who have gone through foster care is not really useful. If they had been aborted, they would not have any thoughts. Those who have been aborted don’t care, because they can’t. The people who have gone through foster care would likely say that they are glad that their parents didn’t abort them because most of us have the will to live. That doesn’t change my mind because it doesn’t address my real concerns. With legal abortions, more children can lead happy lives and more parents will raise their children well. As for the psychological effects of abortion, they change from woman to woman. If you google “abortion stories,” you’ll find that most women who have abortions feel relief afterwards and are able to move forward and lead happy lives. Yes, some women do suffer from depression after the fact, but I’ve found that those women tend to be part of religious communities that tell them that they are sinners or murderers for having an abortion. There is also an issue with women being pressured into having an abortion. Abortion should be the woman’s choice, she should not feel pressure and she should not be shamed.

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          • proteccionparaella

            I think you missed the point on what aborted children think- but to guess what they think is useless as we think differently and can’t ever have an answer, am I right? They have been silenced; we will never know! I believe we may agree to disagree, yet one note to make is that religious communities can also prevent women from falling deep into depression due to their abortion- it can be their way to realize that life goes on beyond ending the life of a child.

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          • hessianwithteeth

            If their religious community helps them cope, then that’s who they should turn to if they are struggling. I just hope that it isn’t their religious community that made them struggle. I’m not religious, so that’s not the community I’d turn to, but I’d never stop someone from seeking help within their religious tradition.

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