Why I Can’t Agree With the Bible: Exodus: Part 1


In the beginning of Exodus, the Israelite’s filled Egypt with their number. The new Pharaoh feared the Israelites would leave Egypt, so he enslaved them. The story of the enslavement of the Israelites is very silly. There are a lot of questions left unanswered. There were only two midwives to help all the Israelite women who were pregnant despite the fact that the Israelites filled the land? How did the Pharaoh find out that the midwives let the boys live? Why did the Pharaoh want all the boys killed when he wanted to keep the Israelites in Egypt? Why was he fine with the girls living?
The story of Moses leaves a lot more questions unanswered. How did the daughter of Pharaoh know that Moses was Hebrew? Why did the slave suggest getting a Hebrew woman to nurse him? Why didn’t she suggest tossing him in the Nile? Why did Pharaoh let his daughter keep a Hebrew baby? How did Moses know he was a Hebrew? How did Moses’ murder become known? And why did he kill the man? Why didn’t the children at the well know that Moses was Hebrew? Why did Jethro just give his daughter to Moses so easily?
Why did Moses decide it was a good idea to walk over to a burning bush because it didn’t burn the bush up? Why did God come to people in person in Genesis, but he came to Moses in the form of a burning bush? Why does Moses ask God what his name is? Why does God want Moses to suggest a sacrifice that won’t be able to happen? Why is Moses so quick to obey God? If Moses and God were alone when Moses talked to God, how does anybody know what happened? Why would God harden Pharaoh’s heart? How is this moral? If God could harden Pharaoh’s heart, and God is so concerned with the people’s suffering, why doesn’t he just get Pharaoh to let the Israelites go? Why was anything that Moses did necessary? Why did God suddenly decide to kill Moses at one point? Why did Zephora’s cutting off her son’s foreskin do anything? Why did her son have a foreskin? What about their other sons? Why were the people so quick to accept that God cared about them when Aaron said he did?
How can I accept any story as truthful when there are so many unanswered questions? I haven’t even gotten to the part where Moses speaks to Pharaoh yet.

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11 responses to “Why I Can’t Agree With the Bible: Exodus: Part 1

  • bbnewsab

    Reblogged this on bbnewsblog and commented:
    This blog series called “Why I Can’t Agree With the Bible: Exodus” consists of three parts.

    Each article is full of relevant questions and objections to the story outlined and told in Exodus.

    Hera are some examples of the questions asked:

    Why did the Pharaoh want all the boys killed when he wanted to keep the Israelites in Egypt? Why was he fine with the girls living?

    How did the daughter of Pharaoh know that Moses was Hebrew? Why did Pharaoh let his daughter keep a Hebrew baby? How did Moses know he was a Hebrew? How did Moses’ murder become known? And why did he kill the man?

    Why did God come to people in person in Genesis, but he came to Moses in the form of a burning bush? Why does Moses ask God what his name is? If Moses and God were alone when Moses talked to God, how does anybody know what happened? Why did Zephora’s cutting off her son’s foreskin do anything? Why did her son have a foreskin? What about their other sons?

    All those questions – and many more which I don’t mention here – come from Part 1 of the series. The following two parts are also full of questions and objections. So it’s close at hand to consider the Exodus story being cram-full of religious bullshit.

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  • johnspenn

    Hello and good day.

    I’m here because you have followed my blog (thank you). I’ve read a few of your articles and I’d just like to point out something obvious. Questions about and disagreements with any particular subject do not render that subject false.

    It seems to me you have asked some good questions and some that seem to be specious. Anyone serious who reads the Bible should have questions, and of course no one has all the answers, and this is true in any field of study.

    I look forward to following your blog and discoursing with you.

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    • hessianwithteeth

      I would hope they’d have questions. This is a 2000 year old (at the newest) book, and from a different culture. How could we possibly hope to not have questions? But it’s amazing how many people get mad at the very concept of questioning it. Personally, I think allowing oneself to question what we’re told is the only why to ensure that one’s beliefs are as honest and healthy as possible.

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      • johnspenn

        Questions can be healthy. Getting mad at questions is just a sign of insecurity, imo. I look forward to following along with your blog. I invite you to do the same as mine, and I encourage questions!

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  • magdahe

    This pretty much sums up my thought process in my Catholic school theology classes. The mental gymnastics required to believe this nonsense was way too much for me.

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  • clubschadenfreude

    hello there,

    thanks for the follow. I agree, trying to excuse the bible by saying that no book will have all of the answers doesn’t work if the book claims to be the absolute and utter truth, written/inspired by a supposedly omnipotent/omniscient god. If we are left with human “interpretation”, we are left with a thousand sects which all claim that their interpretation is the only right one with no evidence of this.

    also wanted to say thanks for talking about those kingdom death miniatures. Very cool things. Used to paint minis all of the time, but now my hands shake a little too much for such fine work.

    because I love to analyze things for fun, it is always amusing to pick apart imaginary things, be they the bible, or Star Trek or LOTR for that matter.

    Pharaoh’s daughter might have known that the baby moses was Hebrew since he could have been circumcised, though the circumstances would seem to have prevented that, with no rabbi or priest in attendance. It does pose a problem if he is so obviously marked, that anyone would allow this child to live in the pharaoh’s household. You also make a good point that it is odd that Zephora’s son still has his.

    it is not moral, at least not good morals, to control someone to show off as this god did. That is repeated as this god’s intent several times.

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  • Berni

    i suspect your point was to show how completely inconsistent and unsatisfactory every single point is in the bible story – as a story or fable lwritten to suggest a ‘moral’ or ‘ammoral’ behaviour its one thing – to announce it as a factual account of happenings and a guide by which to live ones life is another completely and therefore should be able to justify all its inconsistences…

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  • samcroarkin

    While I agree with being skeptical, one problem with asking so many questions is that no one book, regardless of topic and regardless of point of view, is going to have ALL of the answers. While I am no apologist for any dogmatic view, basically what you are saying is that one should not ever trust a history book because they do not chronicle every event. Or don’t believe an Elementary school Physics book because they don’t detail quantum mechanics. I understand being frustrated with those who claim the Bible contains EVERYTHING, but your frustration should be with their ignorance and not with their source. You can’t rewrite the Bible, but you can inform people.

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    • hessianwithteeth

      The difference between the Bible and other books that are claimed to be factual is that with other books I can find the answers to my unanswered questions fairly easily. A history book will focus on one topic. If it doesn’t answer a question, then I can look at the references in the book and read the document that the historian used. I can’t do that with the Bible. I can find a number of Christian websites that will tell me what the Bible is trying to say, but they will all give me the authors personal explanation. I can find a hundred different interpretations of one event. But I won’t be able to find a historical source that will corroborate what the Bible says. I won’t be able to find the answer as to why it happened in any historical source from the time period of the Bible either. The Bible doesn’t have to answer every question, but it does need to provide a reason for me to believe the claims with evidence, sources, and answers to the most relevant questions. At least that’s the standard historians are held to.

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