A Survey About Discrimination Against Atheists


Here is survey number 2 for my project: http://kwiksurveys.com/s.asp?sid=t2k9uo23mlnmklk470896. Please help me and fill it out 🙂

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13 responses to “A Survey About Discrimination Against Atheists

  • 15 Questions for Theists « Paidiske

    […] I’m on the topic, they are also running surveys on discrimination against Christians, against atheists, and because of religion or lack thereof.  I think those surveys are looking at interesting […]

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  • trueandreasonable

    “4If you are not a Christian, do you believe that Christians face wide-spead discrimination because of their identity as a Christian?”

    Where? America, China, Iraq?

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    • hessianwithteeth

      Take it as you see fit. I’m asking if you believe this to be the case, not what your definition of widespread is. You can apply it to simply being within your own country or you take take it to mean the world over.

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  • D.T. Nova

    Question 14’s answers may be open to interpretation. The reason I didn’t check “when they are using their atheism to justify their own discrimination against others” as a justifiable reason for discrimination against an atheist is because in my view, getting someone to stop discriminating isn’t discrimination. (Also, the organizations that use the “not being allowed to discriminate is discrimination against us” argument tend to be Christians ones, whether it’s actual churches or businesses like Hobby Lobby.)

    And the reason I said there don’t need to be new laws protecting atheists is because existing laws are already supposed to, not because I don’t think laws of that nature are needed.

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    • hessianwithteeth

      Of course getting someone to stop discriminating isn’t discrimination. But that’s not what the question was asking. It was asking if you think it is okay to discriminate against someone if you saw them discriminating.
      I agree with you about the laws, but there are a ton of people who think that new laws are necessary.

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      • equippedcat

        Seven times out of ten, a law designed to “fix a problem” does little to fix the problem, and nine times out of ten, unintended results of the law actually result in a net negative impact.

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        • hessianwithteeth

          And why is that partly because of of this is still new, but more over the people writing these laws are not looking into successful laws from other places, and/or do have any experience in writing anti-discrimination laws.

          Law makers can’t be informed on everything, but many choose to not defer to experts ever. Even In Canada it’s been a huge problem with our current federal government. The office of our prime minster is often called a “fact-free zone”

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          • equippedcat

            Yep, often the goal is to give the appearance of “doing something” rather than doing the work to do the “right thing”. And laws separate people into two opposing groups, and the legal system encourages confrontation. Each group attempts to push an interpretation of the the law for their own benefit. And since the law is often the result of political pressure and laziness, this often results in unfortunate and hopefully unintended results.

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      • D.T. Nova

        I don’t see how it’s possible to “discriminate” against someone for discriminating, and even if it is, it doesn’t count as “discrimination against a (religious identity)”, because what they do or don’t believe isn’t the reason for it.

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  • paidiske

    In my context, atheism (or at least, the absence of any religious confession/practice) is not a minority but probably the single biggest social group. I suspect this shapes my answers; I experience my own group (as a church going Christian, at one tenth of the population in my city) as a much smaller minority than atheism.

    I should be clear; the latest census data puts those of “no religion” at 15% in Australia, (which is a minority). But the census data has been criticised widely for including nominal religious affiliation which doesn’t actually reflect people’s beliefs or practices.

    My point is – one could argue the numbers. But I feel like part of a minority group in a secular, atheist-dominated culture; and so that skews my perception of, for example, whether atheists are routinely in positions of power or find themselves facing institutional power routinely wielded by the religious.

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  • equippedcat

    Just because I have not seen what I consider discrimination against atheists does not mean it does not occur. I have seen behavior against atheists which they did not seem happy with, but did not consider it discrimination, and in some cases, not even undeserved. Where there is discrimination or other undesired treatment, I wonder if is more common against those who believe (and preach) that there is no god than against those who don’t have any belief about god.

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  • myatheistlife

    You have problems: You have selected more than the maximum number of answers
    6 – If you answered yes to question 3 or 4, have you ever seen an Atheist being discriminated against for their identity as an Atheist?

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